Science Research

Research Article | | Peer-Reviewed |

Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone

Received: Dec. 17, 2023    Accepted: Jan. 15, 2024    Published: Feb. 05, 2024
Views:       Downloads:

Share

Abstract

Since gully erosion is generated by surface runoff and further enhanced by rough terrain and human-induced variables, it poses a severe danger to the World. The severe and enduring problems for the environment and livelihood in the study area were gully extension and land degradation. The aim of the study was to characterize gulley morphology and evaluate participatory integrated low-cost gully rehabilitation and reclamation techniques for sustainable land management in the Ilasa watershed of Goba distinct Bale highland. The study was carried out in collaboration with the local community to ensure reduced expenses associated with gully reclamation and improved efficacy of gully rehabilitation strategies. Several gully morphological characterizations and reshaping were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the structures. Finally, based on standard soil and water conservation measures physical structures integrated with biological measures were implemented, with various materials readily available locally to reduce the severity of the gulley. The results showed that as gully morphologies classifications standards, the study's area was moderately to severely deteriorate. Prioritizing the rehabilitation and restoration of gullies through morphological assessment, perception collection of data, identification of locally available, low-cost materials, and slope-based implement structures might greatly minimize sediment losses. Reshaping gullies and constructing a check dam with a cut-off drain at the head of the gully to reduce sediment loss and another gullies' branch developments aid in reclamation were more successful strategies. The participatory working with local communities to reclaim gullies could help change farmers' perceptions and uses of low-cost locally available materials to enhance the effectiveness of gully rehabilitation measures which supports farmers' implementation at early stages. Further study on alternative gulley rehabilitation through discharge monitoring and sediment loss in the watershed from different perspectives is advisable to sustainably satisfy the benefits of the community and the viability of natural resources.

DOI 10.11648/sr.20241201.11
Published in Science Research ( Volume 12, Issue 1, February 2024 )
Page(s) 1-8
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Soil Erosion, Gulley Morphologies, Locally Available Materials, Gulley Rehabilitation

References
[1] Abdulfatai, I. A., Okunlola, A. I., Akande, W. G., Momoh, L. O. and Ibrahim, K. O., 2014. Review of gully erosion in Nigeria: causes, impacts and possible solutions.
[2] Addis, H. K., Adugna, B., Gebretsadik, M. and Ayalew, B., 2015. Gully morphology and rehabilitation measures in different agro ecological environments of northwestern Ethiopia. Applied and environmental soil science.
[3] Adgo, E., Teshome, A., and Mati, B. (2013). Impacts of long-term soil and water conservation on agricultural productivity: the case of Anjenie watershed, Ethiopia. Agric. Water Manag. 117, 55–61.
[4] Alfonso-Torreño, A., Schnabel, S., Gómez-Gutiérrez, Á. Crema, S. and Cavalli, M., 2022. Effects of gully control measures on sediment yield and connectivity in wooded rangelands. Catena, 214, 106259.
[5] Bafe Betela and Kebede Wolka. 2021. Evaluating soil erosion and factors determining farmers’ adoption and management of physical soil and water conservation measures in Bachire watershed, southwest Ethiopia. Environmental Challenges 5; 100348.
[6] Bartley, R., Poesen, J., Wilkinson, S. and Vanmaercke, M., 2020. A review of the magnitude and response times for sediment yield reductions following the rehabilitation of gullied landscapes. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 45(13), 3250-3279.
[7] Belayneh M, Yirgu T, Tsegaye D. 2019. Potential soil erosion estimation and area prioritization for better conservation planning in Gumara watershed using RUSLE and GIS techniques'. Environmental Systems Research 8(1): 1-17.
[8] Belayneh, M., Yirgu, T., Tsegaye, D., 2020. Current extent, temporal trends, and rates of gully erosion in the Gumara watershed, Northwestern Ethiopia. Global Ecol. Conserv. 24, e01255.
[9] Borrelli, P., Robinson, D. A., Fleischer, L. R., Lugato, E., Ballabio, C., Alewell, C., Meusburger, C. K., Modugno, S., Schutt, B., Ferro, V., Bagarello, V., Oost, K. V., Montanarella, L., Panagos, P., 2017. An assessment of the global impact of 21st century land use change on soil erosion. Nat. Commun. 8(1), 1–13.
[10] FAO, 2019. Soil erosion: the Greatest Challenge to Sustainable Soil Management. Food and Agriculture of Organization of the United Nations, Rome.
[11] Fazzini M, Bisci C, Billi P. 2015. The climate of Ethiopia. In: Billi P (ed) Landscapes and Landforms of Ethiopia. World geomorphologic landscapes. Springer, Dordrecht.
[12] González-Romero, J., López-Vicente, M., Gómez-Sánchez, E., Peña-Molina, E., Galletero, P., Plaza-Alvarez, P., Moya, D., De las Heras, J. and Lucas-Borja, M. E., 2021. Post-fire management effects on sediment (dis) connectivity in Mediterranean forest ecosystems: Channel and catchment response. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 46(13), 2710-2727.
[13] Haregeweyn, N., Tsunekawa, A., Nyssen, J., Poesen, J., Tsubo, M., Meshesha, D. T., Schütt, B., Adgo, E., Tegegne, F., 2015. Soil erosion and conservation in Ethiopia. Progr. Phys. Geogr. Earth Environ. 39, 750–774.
[14] Heri-Kazi, A. B., Bielders, C. L., 2021. Cropland characteristics and extent of soil loss by rill and gully erosion in smallholder farms in the KIVU highlands, D. R. Congo. Geoderma Reg. 26, e00404.
[15] Karamage, F., Zhang, C., Liu, T., Maganda, A., Isabwe, A., 2017. Soil erosion risk assess- ment in Uganda. Forests 8(52), 1–20.
[16] Lakew Desta, Carucci, V., Asrat Wendem-Ageňehu and Yitayew Abebe (eds). 2005. Community Based Participatory Watershed Development: A Guideline. Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[17] Lieskovsky J, Kenderessy P. 2014. Modelling the effect of vegetation cover and different tillage practices on soil erosion in vineyards: a case study in Vrable (Slovakia) using WATEM/SEDEM. Land degradation and Development 25(3): 288-296.
[18] Mekonen G, Fekadu A. 2015. Experiences and challenges of integrated watershed management in central zones of southern Ethiopia. Int J Curr Res 7(10): 20973–20979.
[19] MoA (Ministry of Agriculture). 2016. Soil and Water Conservation in Ethiopia (Guidelines for Development Agents). Ethiopia.
[20] Mukai, S., Billi, P., Haregeweyn, N., Hordofa, T., 2021. Long-term effectiveness of in- digenous and introduced soil and water conservation measures in soil loss and slope gradient reductions in the semi-arid Ethiopian lowlands. Geoderma 382, 114757.
[21] Mulugeta Eshetu, Shure Sebboka and Falmata Gezachew. 2017. Assessment, Resources Characterization and Mapping of Ilasa Watershed in the Case of Goba Distinct in Highland of Bale Zone, Southeastern Ethiopia. American-Eurasian J. Agric. & Environ. Sci., 17(6): 499-513.
[22] Thomas, D. B. (eds) 1997. Soil and Water Conservation Manual for Kenya. Soil and Water Conservation Branch. Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock Development and Marketing. 210 p.
[23] Zhao, Y., Jia, R. L. and Wang, J., 2019. Towards stopping land degradation in drylands: Water-saving techniques for cultivating biocrusts in situ. Land Degradation and Development, 30(18), 2336-2346.
Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Eshetu, M., Abegeja, D., Ketama, T., Getachow, G., Gosa, R. (2024). Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone. Science Research, 12(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.11648/sr.20241201.11

    Copy | Download

    ACS Style

    Eshetu, M.; Abegeja, D.; Ketama, T.; Getachow, G.; Gosa, R. Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone. Sci. Res. 2024, 12(1), 1-8. doi: 10.11648/sr.20241201.11

    Copy | Download

    AMA Style

    Eshetu M, Abegeja D, Ketama T, Getachow G, Gosa R. Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone. Sci Res. 2024;12(1):1-8. doi: 10.11648/sr.20241201.11

    Copy | Download

  • @article{10.11648/sr.20241201.11,
      author = {Mulugeta Eshetu and Daniel Abegeja and Tesfaye Ketama and Girma Getachow and Regassa Gosa},
      title = {Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone},
      journal = {Science Research},
      volume = {12},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-8},
      doi = {10.11648/sr.20241201.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/sr.20241201.11},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.sr.20241201.11},
      abstract = {Since gully erosion is generated by surface runoff and further enhanced by rough terrain and human-induced variables, it poses a severe danger to the World. The severe and enduring problems for the environment and livelihood in the study area were gully extension and land degradation. The aim of the study was to characterize gulley morphology and evaluate participatory integrated low-cost gully rehabilitation and reclamation techniques for sustainable land management in the Ilasa watershed of Goba distinct Bale highland. The study was carried out in collaboration with the local community to ensure reduced expenses associated with gully reclamation and improved efficacy of gully rehabilitation strategies. Several gully morphological characterizations and reshaping were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the structures. Finally, based on standard soil and water conservation measures physical structures integrated with biological measures were implemented, with various materials readily available locally to reduce the severity of the gulley. The results showed that as gully morphologies classifications standards, the study's area was moderately to severely deteriorate. Prioritizing the rehabilitation and restoration of gullies through morphological assessment, perception collection of data, identification of locally available, low-cost materials, and slope-based implement structures might greatly minimize sediment losses. Reshaping gullies and constructing a check dam with a cut-off drain at the head of the gully to reduce sediment loss and another gullies' branch developments aid in reclamation were more successful strategies. The participatory working with local communities to reclaim gullies could help change farmers' perceptions and uses of low-cost locally available materials to enhance the effectiveness of gully rehabilitation measures which supports farmers' implementation at early stages. Further study on alternative gulley rehabilitation through discharge monitoring and sediment loss in the watershed from different perspectives is advisable to sustainably satisfy the benefits of the community and the viability of natural resources.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

    Copy | Download

  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Participatory Integrated Low-Cost measures Gully Rehabilitation and Reclamation for Sustainable Land Management in Ilasa Watershed of Goba Distinct Bale Zone
    AU  - Mulugeta Eshetu
    AU  - Daniel Abegeja
    AU  - Tesfaye Ketama
    AU  - Girma Getachow
    AU  - Regassa Gosa
    Y1  - 2024/02/05
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/sr.20241201.11
    DO  - 10.11648/sr.20241201.11
    T2  - Science Research
    JF  - Science Research
    JO  - Science Research
    SP  - 1
    EP  - 8
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2329-0927
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/sr.20241201.11
    AB  - Since gully erosion is generated by surface runoff and further enhanced by rough terrain and human-induced variables, it poses a severe danger to the World. The severe and enduring problems for the environment and livelihood in the study area were gully extension and land degradation. The aim of the study was to characterize gulley morphology and evaluate participatory integrated low-cost gully rehabilitation and reclamation techniques for sustainable land management in the Ilasa watershed of Goba distinct Bale highland. The study was carried out in collaboration with the local community to ensure reduced expenses associated with gully reclamation and improved efficacy of gully rehabilitation strategies. Several gully morphological characterizations and reshaping were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the structures. Finally, based on standard soil and water conservation measures physical structures integrated with biological measures were implemented, with various materials readily available locally to reduce the severity of the gulley. The results showed that as gully morphologies classifications standards, the study's area was moderately to severely deteriorate. Prioritizing the rehabilitation and restoration of gullies through morphological assessment, perception collection of data, identification of locally available, low-cost materials, and slope-based implement structures might greatly minimize sediment losses. Reshaping gullies and constructing a check dam with a cut-off drain at the head of the gully to reduce sediment loss and another gullies' branch developments aid in reclamation were more successful strategies. The participatory working with local communities to reclaim gullies could help change farmers' perceptions and uses of low-cost locally available materials to enhance the effectiveness of gully rehabilitation measures which supports farmers' implementation at early stages. Further study on alternative gulley rehabilitation through discharge monitoring and sediment loss in the watershed from different perspectives is advisable to sustainably satisfy the benefits of the community and the viability of natural resources.
    
    VL  - 12
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

    Copy | Download

Author Information
  • Oromia Agricutural Research Institute, Sinana Agriculture Research Center, Soil Fertility Improvement, Soil and Water Conservation, Watershed Management Research Team, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricutural Research Institute, Sinana Agriculture Research Center, Soil Fertility Improvement, Soil and Water Conservation, Watershed Management Research Team, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricutural Research Institute, Sinana Agriculture Research Center, Soil Fertility Improvement, Soil and Water Conservation, Watershed Management Research Team, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricutural Research Institute, Sinana Agriculture Research Center, Soil Fertility Improvement, Soil and Water Conservation, Watershed Management Research Team, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia

  • Oromia Agricutural Research Institute, Sinana Agriculture Research Center, Soil Fertility Improvement, Soil and Water Conservation, Watershed Management Research Team, Bale-Robe, Ethiopia

  • Section